Bonds

Posting Houston Bond > No-Arrest Bonds, Zero Bonds, Cash Bonds

FAQ W Bonds

How do I post a non-arrest bond?

Will I get the money I pay to a bondsman back if I show up to court?

Will I get the money back that I pay for a cash bond?

There is a warrant for my arrest but I cannot afford to post the non-arrest bond; it’s too high. What should I do?

There is a warrant for my arrest but I have a “zero bond”. What should I do?

Why do I have a “zero bond”?

I have no idea what this is all about and why there should be a warrant for my arrest. How can I get more information before turning myself in to post my non-arrest bond?

What if I have a high bond and must choose between either bonding out or retaining a good private attorney?

If I retain Mr. Haggard for someone already in custody, will he be able to get a bond set or reduce a high bond?

How do I bond someone out of jail?


How do I post a non-arrest bond?

You may post a cash bond or go through a professional bonding company.

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Will I get the money I pay to a bondsman back if I show up to court?

No. The 10 to 15% of the bond amount that you pay is the price of your freedom during the pendency of your case.

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Will I get the money back that I pay for a cash bond?

Yes, this money will be refunded to you in the form of a check several weeks after the conclusion of the case, provided you did not forfeit on your bond.

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There is a warrant for my arrest but I cannot afford to post the non-arrest bond; it’s too high. What should I do?

Borrow the money from relatives or obtain a loan for the amount you will need as quickly as possible. If you are nevertheless picked up on the warrant before you have the resources to post bond, you will be given a Court-appointed attorney until such time as you are able to bond out. If Mr. Haggard is retained he will file a Motion to Reduce Bond as soon as you are in custody and can be brought before the judge for a Bond Hearing.

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There is a warrant for my arrest but I have a “zero bond”. What should I do?

Make an appointment with Houston Criminal Defense Attorney Carl Haggard first for a consultation, as this is a situation requiring some strategy. The best way to handle turning yourself in will vary, depending on your case or cases, your prior record, pending cases if any, and the judge, among other factors. Mr. Haggard knows all the judges and their varying procedures and preferences on handling zero bond cases. After consultation he will be able to determine the best strategy for you. He can also file a Motion to Set Bond in some cases which, if granted, may enable you to bond out.

Note: Occasionally the “zero bond” designation is an error. If this is the case, Mr. Haggard will be able to ascertain this and obtain a bond. Unfortunately however you will have to be in custody before the judge will set this bond. Once retained, Mr. Haggard will bring the case before the judge at the earliest possible time.

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Why do I have a “zero bond”?

Reasons may include but are not limited to:

  • Being on probation for another case
  • Being out on bond for another case
  • Being charged with a particularly violent or serious crime
  • Prior criminal convictions
  • A “flight risk” allegation by prosecutors
  • The desire of prosecutors or the judge for conditions or restrictions to be put on a bond which will then be granted with those restrictions and conditions

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I have no idea what this is all about and why there should be a warrant for my arrest. How can I get more information before turning myself in to post my non-arrest bond?

You or someone on your behalf may obtain a copy of the Complaint, which will have basic information on the incident, by going to the District Clerk’s Office of the county in which you are charged. The Houston District Clerk’s Office is at 1201 Franklin. Some counties, including Houston, allow for the faxing of a request for the Complaint with credit card payment information; these request forms can be obtained online from District Clerk’s Office of the county in which you are charged.
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What if I have a high bond and must choose between either bonding out or retaining a good private attorney?

This is your decision but to spend all of your available resources to be released from custody, only to then have ask for a taxpayer-supported attorney, is frowned upon by most judges and many won’t appoint one after you bond out, reasoning that you do have resources. There are exceptions to this on a showing of indigency.

If you are convicted due to inferior or substandard representation you could be back in jail soon, whereas if you use your resources to hire a qualified attorney, you might thereby obtain your permanent release from jail.

Many families do make the decision to leave their loved one in jail to use their available funds to hire the best private attorney they can afford. They realize that they may jeopardize their chances of a successful defense of the case if they spend all of their available resources on a bond and then are unable to retain a successful trial lawyer.

Read about one of our client’s family’s experience in this regard:

AGGRAVATED ROBBERY DEADLY WEAPON,

FELON IN POSSESSION OF WEAPON
Case Nos. 1010622 and 1010623 – Paul D.
DISMISSED ON DAY OF JURY TRIAL

Our client had recently been released from TDC when he was accused of being involved with a robbery while driving in a vehicle with 4 others; all 5 were arrested. Mr. Haggard knew exactly how to exploit certain key weaknesses in the State’s cases and aggressively nailed home a Dismissal of both charges on the morning of trial. Needless to say, Paul’s family was ecstatic, since he had remained in jail throughout the pendency of the case on a high bond: Not being able to afford to both bond him out and hire a good attorney, Paul’s family had chosen to spend their available resources on a successful trial attorney.
Our client’s family was extremely pleased, since he had remained in jail throughout the pendency of the case on a very high bond. Not being able to afford to both bond him out and hire a superior trial attorney, Paul’s family had chosen to spend their available resources on retaining Mr. Haggard’s services.

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If I retain Mr. Haggard for someone already in custody, will he be able to get a bond set or reduce a high bond?

Mr. Haggard will file a Motion to Set or Reduce Bond where applicable which, if granted, enables some of our clients to then bond out of jail.

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How do I bond someone out of jail?

Contact a professional surety bonding company. You will be charged approximately 10% – 15% of the bond amount which will not be refunded to you. This is the price of your freedom during the pendency of your case.

If you have the cash and want to save the 10% -15% fee, you can post a cash bond directly without going through a bondsman. In Houston go to the bonding window at Pretrial Services at 49 San Jacinto. [www.hcso.hctx.net/detention/faq.asp] Your cash bond will be refunded to you in the form of a check 6 to 8 weeks after the conclusion of your case provided the defendant did not forfeit on the bond by failing to appear in court.

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~The Haggard Law Firm accepts selected criminal defense cases in Harris, Fort Bend, Galveston, Brazoria, Montgomery, Matagorda and surrounding Texas counties. Affordable representation; payment plans arranged in some cases. We represent clients in all Misdemeanor Courts, Felony Courts, Juvenile Court and Federal Court.~

Copyright © 2010 The Haggard Law Firm

*Evidence of prior performance should not be taken as a guarantee of future success. All cases are unique and must be handled on an individual basis. Tactics, strategies, and defenses will vary. This is not a comprehensive career-long (since 1973) listing within this category of charges but is intended as a recent and representative sample only.
Note: Clients have given their permission for any testimonials presented here.


Office Locations
8614 Hemlock Hill Drive Houston, TX 77083 (832) 328-0600
1305 Prairie St #305 Houston, TX 77002 (888) 304-1044

The information provided in this website is offered as a public service only, is designed to answer general questions, shall not be construed as legal advice, may not necessarily apply to your case, and will not create an attorney-client relationship. Laws change frequently; consult a qualified attorney regarding your particular case. © 2008-2012 The Haggard Law Firm